Citation Jet / CJ1 / CJ1+

Citation
Jet & CJ1 & CJ1+

Citations For Sale at BusinessJet.com

Cessna Citation Forum

Citation Jet

The highly successful CitationJet was developed as
a replacement for the Citation and Citation I. Improved and stretched
developments, the CJ1 and CJ2 respectively, are under development.

Cessna launched the new Model 525 CitationJet at the annual US
National Business Aircraft Association convention in 1989. First
flight occurred on April 29 1991, FAA certification was awarded
on October 16 1992 and the first delivery was on March 30 1993.


The CitationJet is effectively an all new aircraft. The same basic
Citation forward fuselage is mounted to a new T-tail configured
tailplane and a new supercritical laminar flow wing, and it features
Williams Rolls FJ44 turbofans (with paddle thrust reversers) and
trailing link main undercarriage. The CitationJet’s fuselage is
27cm (11in) shorter than the Citation/Citation I’s, while cabin
height is increased courtesy of a lowered centre aisle. It features
EFIS avionics and is certificated for single pilot operation.

At the 1998 NBAA convention Cessna revealed it was developing the
improved CJ1 and stretched CJ2. The CJ1 will replace the CitationJet
and will introduce a Collins Pro Line 21 EFIS avionics suite and
a moderate increase in maximum takeoff weight.

CJ1

The CJ1 is the second generation of the extremely successful Citation
series. It comes with all of the advantages that the original Citation
Jet offered, but with improvements in economy and performance. Its
status as the second Citation gives the advantage of using a private
jet design that has been tested and modified to eliminate the faults
of the first model.

The design goals of the Citation Jet can be summed up in three
words: simplicity, economy, and performance. This proved to be a
challenge, especially in creating an aerodynamic structure that
is cheap to produce and handles well. Previous Citations had used
a straight wing, which slows the aircraft considerably but dramatically
reduces production and design costs. The Citation Jet upgraded to
a natural laminar flow wing, which took four years to design in
a joint venture between Cessna and NASA. This wing delays the onset
of flow separation longer, which improves the lift-to-drag characteristics
ten to fifteen percent when compared to earlier straight-wing designs.

The CJ1 is extremely fuel-efficient, burning an average of 134
gallons per hour. The economy of its fuel burn can be largely attributed
to Cessna’s choice of engines. It uses two Williams/Rolls-Royce
FJ44-1A turbofans, each of which delivers 1,900 pounds of thrust
on takeoff. They are equipped with firewall shutoff of the fuel
and hydraulics systems as well as dual fire extinguishers for fire
protection.


Another of the CJ1’s strong points contributes to its low
operating cost as well: the simplicity (but reliability) of its
flight systems. It uses the Pro Line 21 avionics package, complete
with PFD and MFD flat-panel screens. The CJ1 is the first business
jet to be equipped with these screens (with the exception of the
gigantic Boeing Business Jet).

The CJ1 is extremely easy to fly and can be single-pilot operated.
The Citation line was designed for forward-thinking businessmen
that would fly their own private jets to and from business meetings,
resulting in several automated systems and a simple avionics system.
For those that don’t plan to fly their own jet, its ability
to be flown by a single pilot offers greater flexibility in flight
operations and reduced per-hour flight costs.

Despite the CJ1’s economy in flight, it allows for a surprisingly
high payload. Its three baggage compartments can carry a total of
832 pounds of luggage. The CJ1 was specifically designed to be able
to operate on short runways. At sea level the CJ1 can take off in
3,080 feet; on runways at an altitude of 5,000 feet, its takeoff
distance increases to 5,710 feet.

The CJ1 has a payload capacity of 1,400 pounds, heavier than the
Citation Jet’s maximum payload. Its maximum takeoff weight
(MTOW) of 10,600 pounds 100 pounds heavier than the MTOW of the
Citation Jet. The maximum fuel weight also increased by 300 pounds
to a total of 3,220 pounds. These alterations resulted in a better
range/payload flexibility, offering owners more options in flight
planning. The most surprising result of the significant increase
in payload is that the CJ1 is actually faster than the regular CJ.

Most owners, knowing the economical features of the CJ1, are surprised
at how comfortable it is. Seats are available for five passengers,
and the full-length dropped aisle gives the cabin a roomier feel.
The double-sealed door uses a fastening system similar to that of
a vault, which reduces cabin noise. An emergency exit is located
over the right wing and the twenty two cubic foot emergency oxygen
system comes standard.

The CJ1 is ideal for small companies and individuals looking for
an economical private jet for short-range missions, usually a little
over one hour. Possible nonstop flights with maximum passengers
include Los Angeles to Aspen and Washington, D.C. to Miami.


CJ1+

At the risk of stating the obvious, the CJ1+ is the enhanced version
of the CJ1. Most private jets that are recreated in a “bigger
and better” design are nearly identical to the original jets.
The CJ1+ is no exception to this rule, but it does some valuable
upgrades. The already-low operating cost of the CJ1 was slashed
to become the lowest operating cost of any comparable turboprop,
and small upgrades on the engines and the increase of usable payload
make a big difference.

The CJ1+ is an extremely fuel-efficient private jet, burning an
average of 132 gallons per hour, a fuel consumption slightly lower
than the CJ1, even though the CJ1+ has a slightly higher payload
than the original CJ1.

The economy of the fuel burn can be largely attributed to Cessna’s
choice of engines, two Williams FJ44-1AP engines. These deliver
slightly more thrust on takeoff than their predecessors, the FJ44-1As.
Natural laminar flow wings are still used in the CJ1+ due to their
success in the previous Citation line. They took four years to design
in a joint venture between Cessna and NASA, but were well worth
the delay. The natural laminar flow wing delays the onset of flow
separation longer, which improves the lift-to-drag characteristics
ten to fifteen percent when compared to previous straight-wing designs.

Another of the CJ1+’s strong points also contributes to its
low operating cost: the simplicity (but reliability) of its flight
systems. Its cockpit has been significantly improved from the CJ1
to offer the latest technology for situational awareness and FADEC.
It uses the Pro Line 21 avionics package, complete with PFD and
MFD flat-panel screens. The CJ1 was the first private business jet
to be equipped with these screens (with the exception of the gigantic
Boeing Business Jet).

The CJ1+ is designed to be as easy to fly as possible. Many of
its systems are automatic, from deicing to cabin pressurization.
Engine bleed air is used for anti-ice protection on the wing edge
and engine, as well as rain removal on the windshield, cabin pressurization,
and heating. An automatic cycling system controls pneumatic deice
boots for protection of the horizontal tail. The benefit of having
such simple operation requirements is that it this private jet can
generally be operated by a single pilot, which provides excellent
flexibility in flight operations.

Despite the CJ1+’s economy in flight, it allows for a surprisingly
high payload. Its three baggage compartments can carry a total of
832 pounds of luggage. The CJ1+ was specifically designed to be
able to easily operate from a 4,000 foot runway under the most difficult
conditions – high temperature and elevation and maximum loading
capacity. The engineers used a new tail assembly to reduce the overall
weight and size of the airplane without reducing cabin size.

The CJ1+ has a significantly increased payload capacity in comparison
to the original CJ. Its maximum take-off weight is 300 pounds heavier
than the original Citation Jet. Its maximum fuel weight also increased
by 300 pounds. These alterations resulted in better maximum range/payload
flexibility, offering owners more options in flight planning. Despite
the increase in overall weight, the CJ1+ is faster than the Citation
Jet. One of its biggest performance improvements is its climb rate:
it took 59 minutes for the CJ1 to climb to 41,00 feet; the CJ1+
can climb to the same altitude in only 32 minutes.

The cabin of the CJ1+ is almost identical to that of the CJ1. It
holds five seats in a club arrangement with one side-facing seat.
Like its predecessor, it has a fully-enclosed lavatory, small galley,
and fold-out work tables. Increased soundproofing techniques make
flights quieter. Entertainment systems can be added as desired.

The CJ1+ is ideal for small companies and individuals looking for
an economical private jet for short-range missions, usually a little
over one hour. Possible nonstop flights with maximum passengers
include Los Angeles to Aspen and Washington, D.C. to Miami.

Cessna 526 CitationJet

A twin-engined jet trainer candidate for the United States Joint Primary Aircraft Training System proposed by Cessna. It was a twin-engined, tandem seat aircraft, based on the Cessna CitationJet executive aircraft. It was, however, unsuccessful, with only two prototypes built.

The United States military issued a Request for proposal for a jet trainer for use by the United States Air Force and United States Navy. Cessna responded with the 526 based on the Cessna 525 CitationJet business jet it included 75% commonality including the wings, engine, landing gear. Also common were the electrical, hydraulic and fuel system. New were a tandem two-seat cockpit with zero-zero ejection seats, new fuselage and tail unit.

The prototype first flew on 20 December 1993 and was followed by a second prototype on 2 March 1994.   The CitationJet did not succeed in the competition which was won by a variant of the Pilatus PC-9 which became the T-6 Texan II.  The Rockwell Ranger also was considered in the competition.

 


Home airport:

CJ1+6300350$35008

Aircraft Type NBAA Range NM Cruise Speed DOC’s per hour Seating Wingspan Height Length
Citation Jet 2780 350 $1289 6      
CJ1 6300 350 $3500 6      

Powerplants

CitationJet & CJ1 – Two 8.45kN (1900lb) Williams Rolls-Royce
FJ44-1A turbofans. CJ2 – Two 10.2kN (2300lb) FJ442Cs.

Performance

CitationJet – Max cruising speed at 3990kg (8800lb) AUW 704km/h
(380kt). Initial rate of climb 3311ft/min. Certificated ceiling
41,000ft. Range with max fuel and reserves 2750km (1485nm). CJ1
– Range with pilot, three passengers and IFR reserves 2315km (1250nm).
CJ2 – Max cruising speed at 33,000ft 741km/h (400kt). Service ceiling
45,000ft. Range with pilot, three passengers and IFR reserves 2687km
(1450nm).

Weights

CitationJet – Empty 2794kg (6160lb), max takeoff 4717kg (10,400lb).
CJ1 – Max takeoff 4812kg (10,600lb). CJ2 – Max takeoff 5585kg (12,300lb).

Dimensions

CitationJet & CJ1 – Wing span 14.26m (46ft 10in), length 12.98m
(42ft 7in), height 4.18m (13ft 8in). Wing area 22.3m2 (240.0sq ft).
CJ2 – Wing span 15.18m (49ft 10in), length 14.30m (46ft 11in).

Capacity

CitationJet & CJ1 – Two flightdeck positions, one for pilot,
other for a copilot or passenger. Main cabin seats five in standard
layout. CJ2 – Main cabin seats six in standard club arrangement.


Information gathered from various internet sources. Reasonable attempts
have been made to ensure accuracy and veracity of sources. However,
this information should not be used for flight planning or official
purposes.

© 2006 BusinessJet.com, LLC

BusinessJet.com — Business Jet Online Magazine

 

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